Benjamin Diaz

Dorner suicide prevents reward money going to kidnap, carjack victims who alerted police

Mar 25, 2013

LOS ANGELES  – While the manhunt for fired LAPD Officer Christopher Dorner was in progress last month, rewards in excess of $1 million were offered in connection with the case, but some groups that pledged money are reconsidering, saying their criteria were not met, it was reported today.

Two claims have been made on the money since Dorner’s death Feb. 12 — by a couple near Big Bear who were tied up and whose car was stolen, and by a man whose pickup truck Dorner later hijacked.

However, some who pledged money have said they offered the reward for information that would have led to the arrest and conviction of Dorner, neither of which occurred, the Los Angeles Times reported. Dorner committed suicide while cornered in a burning cabin near Big Bear.

The Los Angeles Police Department, responding to the arguments donors have made publicly, said the money should be paid.

Much of the confusion surrounding the conditions of the reward began with the language used by Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa in his announcement of a $1 million reward.

Donors specified that the money they pledged was for Dorner’s arrest and conviction. But Villaraigosa broadened it to “capture” in his public remarks — and some have argued that the word could be interpreted to include Dorner’s being surrounded in a cabin before he committed suicide, The Times reported.

Police believe Dorner went on a 10-day killing rampage of revenge against law enforcement officials whom he blamed for his 2009 firing from the force. He is thought to have killed Riverside Police Officer Michael Crain; San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Deputy Jeremiah MacKay; Monica Quan, the daughter of a retired LAPD captain; and Quan’s fiance, Keith Lawrence.

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Michael Jackson wrongful death lawsuit: Judge allows for Conrad Murray testimony, 2005 molestation trial drug abuse

Mar 22, 2013

LOS ANGELES  – A judge today left open the door for Dr. Conrad Murray to testify in the trial of a civil suit by Michael Jackson’s mother, Katherine Jackson, who alleges AEG Live negligently hired him to care for her son before his never-realized London concerts.

Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Yvette Palazuelos also said attorneys for the entertainment conglomerate can bring before the jury evidence of Jackson’s 2005 trial and acquittal of child molestation charges. She said the information could be relevant to the singer’s history of despondency and drug abuse.

Attorneys for Katherine Jackson said the fact her son was found not guilty of molestation supported their position the information should be kept out.     The entertainer was set to perform a string of 50 shows in London, but died on June 25, 2009, at age 50, of acute propofol intoxication at his rented home in Holmby Hills while rehearsing for the sold-out concert series.

His mother sued in September 2010 on behalf of her son’s three children, Michael Jr., Paris-Michael Katherine and Prince Michael, claiming that the company was liable for picking Murray to be pop star’s personal physician. Jury selection is scheduled April 2 and the attorneys estimated the trial will last two to three months.

Thursday’s rulings took place on a day a panel of the 2nd District Court of Appeal denied a request by AEG Live to put the trial on hold while the judge’s Feb. 28 decision to allow the case to go forth on a negligent hiring cause of action was revisited.

Murray was on the original list of prospective witnesses to be called by the plaintiffs. However, Katherine Jackson’s attorney, Kevin Boyle, said the doctor’s lawyers told him the doctor would assert his Fifth Amendment rights and refuse to testify. Boyle said Murray’s attorneys asked that he thus not be called to the stand in the civil suit.

However, AEG Live attorney Jessica Stebbins Bina said Murray could be helpful as a defense witness because he has said on record that Jackson hired him, not AEG Live. She also said he cannot assert his right against self- incrimination on every question and that his answers to inquiries where the Fifth Amendment does not apply can be heard by the civil trial jury.

Murray retains his Fifth Amendment protection through the course of his appeal of his involuntary manslaughter conviction in Jackson’s death. He was sentenced in November 2011 to four years in the Los Angeles County Men’s jail.

Palazuelos also said AEG Live attorneys can tell the jury that nurse anesthetist David Fournier twice said that he believed Jackson deceived him by not revealing he had a Narcan implant inserted in his body before a surgical procedure in which Fournier assisted. Fournier said he believed Jackson did not reveal the information out of fear the nurse would not administer anesthesia to him.

The implant is designed to block the brain’s opiate receptors.

The judge also ruled Katherine Jackson’s lawyers can mention Jackson’s possible inebriation on the eve of the March 2009 announcement of the London concert tours to show AEG Live allegedly knew Murray was not properly caring for Jackson.

Palazuelos additionally said Katherine Jackson can be quizzed by AEG Live lawyers as to why she and her attorneys decided not to sue Murray. AEG Live attorneys maintain she chose not to do so because he has limited finances.

But the judge said Jackson’s children cannot be questioned regarding the decision not to sue Murray.

Kathryn Cahan, another AEG Live attorney, told Palazuelos that Prince Michael said in a recent deposition that he does not blame Murray for his father’s death and considers him “a good person.”

In yet another ruling, Palazuelos said Katherine Jackson’s lawyers cannot present evidence about Murray visiting strip clubs the week of Jackson’s death because it would be prejudicial to AEG Live. However, she said the plaintiffs’ attorneys can present information about the doctor having financial problems from overdue child support payments.

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Police raid Lancaster casinos fronting as Internet cafes

Mar 22, 2013

LANCASTER – Deputies from the sheriff’s Lancaster Station Thursday afternoon raided five Internet casinos, posing as Internet cafes, and detained several people in what was believed to be the first such illegal gambling busts in Los Angeles County.

Deputy Jordan Lance said the locations billed themselves as Internet cafes where customers could go check their e-mail or their Facebook accounts, but in this case the emphasis was on “Vegas style” gambling.

The major such casino was at 1015 W. Avenue I, Lance said, and simply had the name “Internet” on the door.

Lance said that the casinos “opened up as Internet cafe, that’s how they got business licenses, as if they were only selling Internet time. But that’s only a front for the operation. Ninety percent of their business is what they call sweepstakes.

The way it operates, he said, is that the customer pays cash for credits to play Vegas style slot or casino games on the computers. Players are given a pin number and at the end of the gaming collect whatever winnings they have accumulated or forfeit the deposit for losses.

Lance said that deputies were originally alerted to the Internet casinos because of complaints from nearby businesses about alleged drugs and gang members at the storefronts.

Undercover deputies were sent in to gather evidence, Lance said.

He said that  search warrants were served on all five locations at about 1 p.m. today and that several people were detained.

Lance said that at the one location on West Avenue I, one customer was arrested for narcotics and a wanted parolee was taken into custody.

Four people were arrested at that location and thousands of dollars were seized, he said.

Lance said that although he believed these were the first such arrests in Los Angeles County, the problem has been popping up around the country.

Similar casinos were busted in Hesperia and others in the San Diego area.

“We’re also waiting to get in touch with the owners who did not choose to come in,” Lance said.

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Mistrial declared on remaining charges against Bell defendants

Mar 22, 2013

LOS ANGELES  – With jurors saying they were hopelessly deadlocked and tensions running high in the deliberation room, a mistrial was declared Thursday on remaining charges against five former Bell elected officials already convicted of misappropriating public funds by collecting exorbitant salaries.

The mistrial capped a final day of deliberations that included a series of jury notes that grew increasingly tense as the day wore on.

“It seems to me that all hell has broken loose in the jury deliberation room,” Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Kathleen Kennedy told attorneys after receiving a pair of notes from the seven-woman, five-man panel early this afternoon.

One of the missives indicated the jury was deadlocked on charges involving salaries the defendants received for serving on the city’s Surplus Property Authority, and also said a juror had sent a personal note that he shared with another juror but would not share with the remainder of the panel.

In the other note, a juror wrote to the judge, “I respectfully ask if you could please remind the jury to remain respectful and not to make false accusations (or) insults to one another.”

The judge summoned the jury into court and all 12 said further deliberations would not help to break the deadlock on the remaining charges against former Bell Mayor Oscar Hernandez and ex-City Council members Teresa Jacobo, George Mirabal, George Cole and Victor Bello.

The jury’s foreman told the judge that nine of the jurors favored conviction on the deadlocked counts, while three others were voting in favor of acquittal.

On Wednesday, Hernandez, Jacobo and Mirabal were each convicted of five counts of misappropriation of public funds and acquitted of five others. Cole was convicted of two counts and acquitted of two others, while Bello was convicted of four counts and acquitted of four others.

The panel completely exonerated former Councilman Luis Artiga of all 12 counts against him.

While excusing the jury Thursday, the judge noted that “apparently things got a little heated” among the panelists. She said she hopes the discord “isn’t the thing you take away from your jury service,” saying their efforts to reach verdicts were “commendable.”

Kennedy noted that the jurors’ identities would be kept confidential, saying the only way the information would be released is if there is some justification for it and that jurors could oppose the release of such information.

She said jurors had indicated that they did not want to speak to attorneys or the media about the lengthy case.

The judge set a sentencing date for April 23, when prosecutors will also discuss whether they plan to seek a retrial on the remaining counts. The ex- city officials are all free on bail.

Mirabal, who described the last two years as an “ordeal,” said he was “appreciative of the three jurors that felt we should be acquitted” of the remaining charges.

Some defense attorneys said they believe their clients could be sentenced to probation, rather than any time behind bars. They said they were hopeful the District Attorney’s Office would decide not to re-try the remaining counts.

Mirabal’s attorney, Alex Kessel, told reporters that prosecutors “already took one big bite out of the apple.”

Cole’s attorney, Ronald Kaye, noted that there is a new administration in the District Attorney’s Office, referring to District Attorney Jackie Lacey’s election to replace Steve Cooley, who was district attorney when the charges were filed about 2 1/2 years ago.

“We just hope that they won’t proceed any further,” Kaye told reporters.

The defense attorneys said they hope jurors will reach out to them so they can determine if any misconduct occurred during the panel’s deliberations.

Bello’s attorney, Leo Moriarty, said, “The guilt counts are not set in stone … The guilt counts are in doubt in our minds.”

Deputy District Attorney Edward Miller told jurors during the trial that the officials misappropriated public funds by collecting unlawful salaries for sitting on four city boards — the Community Housing Authority, Surplus Property Authority, Public Financing Authority and Solid Waste and Recycling Authority — that rarely met.

Defense attorneys contended their clients were wrongly accused, arguing they worked diligently for the city and earned their salaries.

After the guilty verdicts were read Wednesday, the jury foreman said the panel was split 9-3 on remaining counts against the defendants, but four female jurors said they felt more instructions from the judge might help break the deadlock. Kennedy asked the panel to submit specific questions and sent jurors back into the deliberation room.

Several more notes followed, with jurors asking for more information and eventually asking today whether the judge intended to give them any more instructions beyond what they had already received.

By mid-afternoon, the panel sent the note indicating the deadlock.

Earlier today, one juror sent a note claiming the guilty verdicts may have been “improper” due to pressure during deliberations.

“I have been debating in my own mind that due to the pressure and stress of the deliberation process, the jury may have given an improper verdict of guilty on the Solid Waste Authority,” the juror wrote, referencing one of the boards the elected officials received salaries for. “Further information or evidence the court can provide on (former Bell City Attorney) Edward Lee may help clarify reasonable doubt on this matter.

“It is better to be certain beyond a reasonable doubt to give a verdict of guilty than send someone innocent to prosecution. If possible, I request to remain anonymous,” the juror wrote.

Mirabal’s attorney said the juror’s reference to “pressure” raised the possibility of jury misconduct. But the judge said there is pressure in every jury deliberation and it was “not tantamount to misconduct.”

The judge denied Kessel’s request that she conduct an inquiry and identify the juror, but said later she would find out on her own which juror sent the note.

In one of the notes sent Wednesday, a juror wrote that if new information was provided in hopes of breaking the deadlock, it would not be fair as the case relates to charges involving the Solid Waste and Recycling Authority, for which the defendants had already been convicted. The juror also said he was questioning himself on information that he felt wasn’t “presented properly,” writing that it “had me on a (doubt).”

The judge told attorneys she would only “entertain questions on which verdicts have not been reached.”

Kennedy decided today she would respond to one juror’s request for clarification on laws related to Bell’s Community Housing Authority by telling the panel that service on that board is governed by state law and board members can be paid for four meetings a month at $50 a meeting — over the objection of numerous defense attorneys.

The judge denied requests by Mirabal’s attorney to re-open closing arguments and by Cole’s attorney to re-open evidence.

The jury’s guilty verdicts involved payments made for the defendants’ work on the Solid Waste and Recycling Authority, while the counts on which all of the defendants were acquitted involved the Public Financing Authority.

Jurors were deadlocked on charges involving payments for the defendants’ work on the Community Housing Authority and the Surplus Property Authority.

Hernandez, 65, Jacobo, 55, and Mirabal, 63, were each originally charged with 20 counts of misappropriating public funds between January 2006 and July 2010; Bello, 54, was charged with 16 counts of misappropriation between January 2006 and December 2009; Artiga, 52, was charged with 12 counts of misappropriation between January 2008 and July 2010; and Cole, 63, was charged with eight counts of misappropriation between January 2006 and December 2007.

Former City Manager Robert Rizzo, 59, who is accused of being the mastermind of the alleged corruption scheme, is awaiting trial separately, along with former assistant Angela Spaccia, 54, on corruption-related charges.

Jurors initially got the case Feb. 22, but a juror was replaced Feb. 28 – – with the judge ordering the panel to begin its deliberations anew — after an alternate juror replaced a panelist who acknowledged she had done research on the Internet and talked to her daughter about what she called “the abuse” she suffered from other jurors.

The reconstituted panel was in its 13th day of deliberations when it buzzed at about 10 a.m. Wednesday to notify the court that it had reached verdicts.

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Judge: ‘Superman’ belongs to Warner Bros.

Mar 22, 2013

LOS ANGELES  –  Warner Bros. has scored another victory in the legal battle over the rights to the Superman character.

A Los Angeles federal judge ruled that the heirs of co-creator Jerry Siegel are bound by a 2001 agreement over ownership of the Man of Steel, according to court papers obtained today.

The written decision by U.S. District Judge Otis D. Wright II, dated Wednesday, affirms a January finding by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeal that the 12-year-old settlement giving Warner Bros. ownership rights over the character is binding.

The appellate panel determined that a different judge had erred by ruling in favor of Siegel’s heirs, who challenged the validity of the settlement and demanded more ownership rights over the character.

The panel ruled, however, that the judge, who subsequently resigned from the bench, “failed to address whether the October 19, 2001, letter from (Laura Siegel Larson’s) then-attorney constituted acceptance of terms negotiated between the parties, and thus was sufficient to create a contract.”

“We hold, as a matter of law, that the October 19, 2001, letter did constitute such an acceptance,” the ruling states.

The panel noted that the letter included five pages of terms outlining compensation for the heirs and the rights to the character.

Warner Bros. plans to release the latest Superman film, titled “Man of Steel,” this summer.

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Columbia Pictures, Paramount, Disney win in federal appeals court against Canadian search engine

Mar 22, 2013

LOS ANGELES  – A federal appeals panel in Pasadena Thursday issued a unanimous decision against the Canadian search engine isoHunt for “inducing” users to illegally download and distribute copyrighted movies and TV programs.

A three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals concluded that isoHunt owner Gary Fung is liable for contributing to violations of federal copyright law.

Columbia Pictures, Disney, Paramount and other Hollywood studios sued Fung in Los Angeles federal court in 2006, alleging that isoHunt and other sites Fung operated helped Internet users find and watch copyrighted material without charge.

U.S. District Judge Stephen V. Wilson granted the film companies summary judgment in 2009 and issued an injunction limiting Fung’s activities.

The appeals court affirmed Wilson’s ruling that Fung and isoHunt committed copyright infringement by helping users access copyrighted shows over the BitTorrent peer-to-peer network.

Further, the appellate court held that isoHunt and Fung were not protected by the “safe harbor” provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.

“This ruling affirms a core principle of copyright law: Those who build businesses around encouraging, enabling, and helping others to commit copyright infringement are themselves infringers, and will be held accountable for their illegal actions,” said Henry Hoberman, senior executive vice president and global general counsel for the Motion Picture Association of America.

“It also strikes an important blow in the fight to preserve the jobs of millions of workers in the creative industries, whose hard work and investments are exploited by rogue websites for their own profit,” Hoberman said.

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Obama to hold court with Galaxy, Kings; L.A. soccer and hockey champs

Mar 22, 2013

LOS ANGELES  – The Los Angeles Kings and L.A. Galaxy will pay a visit next week to the White House, where President Barack Obama will congratulate them, then turn over the South Lawn to the championship teams for a “Let’s Move!” clinic with youths.

The president will address the two teams during the Tuesday visit and chat with players and coaches briefly before the makeshift soccer field features a group of young athletes associated with the U.S. Soccer Foundation’s Soccer for Success, America SCORES and the National Hockey League’s Hockey is for Everyone program.

The Kings defeated the New Jersey Devils to win the franchise’s first Stanley Cup crown last year. The Galaxy — one of Major League Soccer’s most decorated teams — ended its David Beckham era by winning the MLS Cup for the fourth time.

“Lets Move!” is first lady Michelle Obama’s project aimed at getting kids to exercise more.

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Fox announces O.J. Simpson trial miniseries

Mar 21, 2013

HOLLYWOOD  – A potential miniseries on the O.J. Simpson trial is under development at Fox Broadcasting, the network announced today.

The project has the working title, “The Run of His Life: The People v. O.J. Simpson,” is based on the 1997 book of the same name by Jeffrey Toobin. The script is being written by Scott Alexander and Larry Karaszewski, whose credits include the scripts for the films  “The People vs. Larry Flint,” “Man on the Moon” and “Ed Wood.”

The producers are Nina Jacobson, a producer of “The Hunger Games” and “Diary of a Wimpy Kid” and Brad Simpson, who also produced “Diary of a Wimpy Kid” and the upcoming Brad Pitt-starring zombie film “World War Z.”

Fox also announced today it is developing a miniseries on James Clavell’s 1975 novel on 17th century feudal Japan, “Shogun.” NBC aired a 12- hour miniseries adaptation of “Shogun” in 1980 that received 14 Emmy nominations and three Emmys.

“These are both epic stories — one fiction, one fact — that have captivated millions of people worldwide,” said Shana C. Waterman, Fox Broadcasting Company’s senior vice president, event series & multi-platform programming.

“They’re riveting and emotional, with unique historic backdrops that lend themselves to the high-quality, dramatic event series we’re looking to make.”

Fox announced earlier it is developing potential miniseries based on the novel “Pines” and “Blood Brothers” on the U.S. Military Academy’s Class of 1861, whose members fought on both sides in the Civil War.

Fox will order its first miniseries later this season, which will be aired in 2014.

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5 ex-Bell officials convicted, 1 acquitted in sweeping corruption case

Mar 21, 2013

LOS ANGELES  – Five former Bell city officials were convicted today of misappropriating public funds by accepting exorbitant salaries while representing the small municipality, but jurors acquitted them of some charges and exonerated one former councilman altogether.

Former Mayor Oscar Hernandez and former council members Teresa Jacobo and George Mirabal were each convicted of five counts of misappropriation of public funds and acquitted of five others. Former Councilman George Cole was convicted of two counts and acquitted of two others, while former Councilman Victor Bello was convicted of four counts and acquitted of four others.

Former Councilman Luis Artiga was the only defendant to be completely exonerated, with jurors acquitting him of all 12 counts against him. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Kathleen Kennedy told Artiga, who cried as the verdicts were announced, “You’re free to go, sir.”

“First and foremost, I want to thank my Lord and savior Jesus Christ for setting me free of these false accusations,” Artiga, a pastor, said outside the courtroom as relatives gathered around him in tears.

Artiga told reporters he had been “falsely accused” and said he maintained from the beginning that “the truth was going to set me free.”

“I didn’t go there for the money,” he said.

Artiga’s attorney, George Mgdesyan, told reporters that his client was not on the council when it voted to raise the members’ salaries for their work on various city boards, adding that all his client did was “work hard for the city of Bell.”

The seven-woman, five-man jury was unable to reach verdicts on the remaining counts against the five other defendants, with the panel’s foreman telling Kennedy the jury was split 9-3 on each count — without revealing whether the jury was leaning toward conviction or acquittal.

The judge asked if anything further could be done, noting, “I hate to say further deliberations because you have deliberated and deliberated and deliberated.”

The judge noted that the panel had been involved in “extended deliberations,” with the foreman saying the jury had taken “multiple” votes on the charges on which they had not been able to reach verdicts.

Four of the female jurors indicated, however, that the deadlock might be resolved with some further instructions from the judge. After the lunch break, they sent notes asking for clarification on the laws related to Bell’s Community Housing Authority, whether state law supersedes the city’s charter and further detail on the definition of wrongful intent.

Another juror sent a note in which he wrote that if new information was provided it would not be fair for the Solid Waste Authority — hours after the five defendants were convicted of charges involving payments for service on Bell’s Solid Waste and Recycling Authority. That juror also noted that he questioned himself on information that he felt wasn’t “presented properly,” writing that it “had me on a (doubt).”

The note prompted Cole’s attorney, Ronald Kaye, to ask the judge to individually question the juror about his verdict, saying that it suggested the juror may have had a doubt about the jury’s decision.

The judge responded that jurors had indicated “those were their verdicts” and that she was “not going to re-open verdicts that have been reached.” She said she was “only going to entertain questions for which no verdicts have been entered.”

The jury is due back in court Thursday morning, when the judge is expected to respond to the questions after consulting with attorneys.

Jurors initially got the case Feb. 22, but a juror was replaced Feb. 28 – – with the judge ordering the panel to begin its deliberations anew — after an alternate juror replaced a panelist who acknowledged she had done research on the Internet and talked to her daughter about what she called “the abuse” she suffered from other jurors.

The reconstituted panel was in its 13th day of deliberations when it buzzed at about 10 a.m. to notify the court that it had reached verdicts.

Bello’s attorney, Leo J. Moriarty, said after the morning session that it was unclear how much time behind bars the five defendants could face, but he said they could simply be sentenced to probation under the counts on which they have been convicted.

Deputy District Attorney Edward Miller told jurors during the trial that the officials misappropriated public funds by collecting unlawful salaries for sitting on four city boards — the Community Housing Authority, Surplus Property Authority, Public Financing Authority and Solid Waste and Recycling Authority — that rarely met.

Defense attorneys maintained their clients were wrongly accused, arguing they worked diligently for the city and earned their salaries.

All six defendants were acquitted of charges involving payment for service as a member of the city’s Public Financing Authority.

Hernandez, Jacobo, Mirabal, Bello and Cole were each convicted of charges involving payment for their service on the Solid Waste and Recycling Authority, but jurors deadlocked on 10 charges involving payment for their work on the city’s Community Housing Authority and the Surplus Property Authority.

Hernandez, 65, Jacobo, 55, and Mirabal, 63, were each charged with 20 counts of misappropriating public funds between January 2006 and July 2010; Bello, 54, was charged with 16 counts of misappropriation between January 2006 and December 2009; Artiga, 52, was charged with 12 counts of misappropriation between January 2008 and July 2010; and Cole, 63, was charged with eight counts of misappropriation between January 2006 and December 2007.

Former City Manager Robert Rizzo, 59, who is accused of being the mastermind of the alleged corruption scheme, is awaiting trial separately, along with former assistant Angela Spaccia, 54, on corruption-related charges.

During the lengthy deliberations, the jury occasionally requested readback of testimony, most recently last week when it asked to re-hear testimony from Jacobo about her conversation with Rizzo “about becoming full- time and pay and any testimony of the date of said conversation.”

Jacobo testified last month that Rizzo called her to his office and told her that she would be able to work full-time    and that she would be getting paid a full-time salary.

“I asked him if that was possible,” Jacobo told the jury last month, noting that Rizzo responded affirmatively and that City Attorney Ed Lee nodded his head.

“My feeling was if the city attorney said it was O.K. to do so, it must be legal,” she testified.

The jury also asked for readback of any testimony about Hernandez’s ability to read and write in English.

The judge told jurors that there were representations made during opening statements about Hernandez’s educational background, but warned them “what the attorneys say is not evidence.”

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Restraining order issued between Conrad Murray attorneys after jailhouse, doughnut shop altercations

Mar 21, 2013

PASADENA  – An attorney who ended his representation of Dr. Conrad Murray after a heated jailhouse altercation with his co-counsel has obtained a temporary restraining order against the woman, alleging she threw hot water at him at a doughnut shop.

Last Thursday, Pasadena Superior Court Judge Terry Smerling directed Valerie Wass not to come within 200 yards of Michael Flanagan, his business and his car. She also was directed not to harass or intimidate him.

A hearing on whether to extend the order is scheduled April 3.

Flanagan had been assisting Wass, who is working as Murray’s appellate attorney, seeking to overturn his November 2011 involuntary manslaughter conviction in the June 2009 death of pop star Michael Jackson.

The two attorneys, along with Flanagan’s son, were involved in a physical and verbal altercation at the Los Angeles County Men’s Jail in Los Angeles in January as they were visiting Murray, where the doctor is serving a four-year sentence.

Wass filed a police report alleging Flanagan’s son pushed her, according to media reports.

According to court papers filed by Flanagan’s lawyer, Charles Unger, Wass confronted Flanagan on March 8 at a Winchell’s doughnut shop on Lake Avenue.

“Miss Wass came into Winchell’s … yelling gross profanities and threw a scalding hot container of coffee at my face and torso,” Flanagan stated in his court papers. “I was slightly burned by the coffee and also incurred property damage to clothing.”

Wass told a reporter afterward that she “should have shot me,” Flanagan’s court papers state.

Wass also has “stalked” Flanagan other times at Winchell’s, at Crispy’s Deli in Glendale and at the jail, Flanagan’s court papers state. She also has been “relentless with obscene emails to my office,” Flanagan’s court papers state.

Flanagan alleges the situation has gotten worse over time.

“In each of these incidents she used physical force and extreme profanity,” Flanagan states. “Each incident is getting progressively more violent.”

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